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Jonathan's picture
ModeratorSeriously Addicted
Posts: 194
Joined: Jan 2 2016 - 12:08pm
Post your pre and post flight check procedures here

Before and after each flight, it's good to perform a routine set of checks to ensure everyone's safety, prevent damage, and confirm that your devices are working properly

Do you have a favorite set of procedures? Feel free to post them here.

Here's a generic set of procedures to start off:

Pre-flight:
--------------
 

  • Flight battery condition – use built-in indicators or a cell-checker
  • Propellors on tight, the right way up, on the correct motors.
  • Failsafe armed if applicable - has the failsafe been set up and is the RTH function available to you?
  • Check for loose items.  Vibration is always present on some level; this can result in nuts and setscrews shaking loose over time. 
  • When batteries are removed for charging, ensure that they have been securely reattached.
  • Ensure that cameras or any other type of payload are still firmly attached
  • Weather still suitable?

Transmitter

  • Ensure No battery warning showing
  • All switches up
  • Antenna correctly positioned
  • Throttle at zero. (so that it doesn't leap straight at you or someone else on power up)

Contingency planning - Think through your options if something goes wrong
Some options:

  1. Let go of the controls. It could be an erroneous command that you are giving that is causing the problem.
  2. Switch to GPS mode. The drone will hold position whilst you collect your wits. 
  3. If definitely crashing, cut the throttle. This will save the props and motors – and save whatever you are crashing into from prop strike damage.

Post-flight:
---------------

  • Power down or disconnect the battery, followed by the transmitter battery (if not flying anymore for the day).
  • Perform maintenance. Give the drone a once over, just like the pre-flight inspection, to see if there are any issues that    will require attention before your next flying session.
  • If you keep a flight log, which is a good thing to do, create an entry and fill in the details of your flight
PopPopFPV's picture
Senior Member
Posts: 40
Joined: Apr 21 2016 - 6:38am
Jonathan wrote:

Jonathan wrote:
Before and after each flight, it's good to perform a routine set of checks to ensure everyone's safety, prevent damage, and confirm that your devices are working properly
Do you have a favorite set of procedures? Feel free to post them here.
Here's a generic set of procedures to start off:
Pre-flight:
--------------
 

  • Flight battery condition – use built-in indicators or a cell-checker
  • Propellors on tight, the right way up, on the correct motors.
  • Failsafe armed if applicable - has the failsafe been set up and is the RTH function available to you?
  • Check for loose items.  Vibration is always present on some level; this can result in nuts and setscrews shaking loose over time. 
  • When batteries are removed for charging, ensure that they have been securely reattached.
  • Ensure that cameras or any other type of payload are still firmly attached
  • Weather still suitable?

One other item for pre-flight to add; Are you flying in a restricted area? Is it legal to fly where you are?
There are a few quad manufacturers that have "built-in" detection as to where you can fly or not. You know who they are ;)
But there are also a few apps available that can give you weather forecasts, fly/no-fly zones and other features suited to multi-rotor flights.
I was "burned" for flying in a no-fly zone. I was unaware that I was within the 5 mile no-fly zone of an airport. (Military Air Force Base)
Funny thing was, I only had to go across the street and I was out of the zone. No fines, no arrest, but a scare none the less.
So be well aware of where you are before flying.

Jonathan's picture
ModeratorSeriously Addicted
Posts: 194
Joined: Jan 2 2016 - 12:08pm
PopPopFPV, great advice! To

PopPopFPV, great advice! To add to that, we're at a time when rules and regulations are still being amended in many countries. Before flying, it's a good idea for everyone to make sure they're up to date with the rules and restrictions; they may have changed since you last looked.

As PopPopFPV mentioned, there are apps that will tell you whether you're in a no fly zone:

Some companies like DJI have this feature built into their apps.

Some third party solutions:

US: 

Airmap (free and paid options) - https://app.airmap.io/
FAA's B4UFLY (free) -  https://www.faa.gov/uas/b4ufly/
Hivemapper (free) - http://hivemapper.com

Worldwide:

Drone Deploy - https://dronedeploy.com/
Skyward - https://skyward.io/

UK:

Altitude Angel (free and paid options) - https://www.altitudeangel.com/

I'm sure there are others. More additions are welcome!

Airwolf's picture
Senior Contributor
Posts: 56
Joined: Feb 29 2016 - 3:44pm
While I haven't really used

While I haven't really used these (some have been out for a while and will probably be replaced by newer and better stuff), here's some others that I know about

http://www.hoverapp.io/ - US
http://www.droneshare.com/ - a project that came out of 3DR, looks like US only

http://www.noflydrones.co.uk/ - free website for UK
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/drone-zones-safe-places-to/id992074198?mt=8 - free app for UK, looks like it's still being updated

Cloudkiller's picture
Senior Contributor
Posts: 63
Joined: Jan 9 2016 - 11:48am
I tried Hivemapper out months

I tried Hivemapper out months ago. Seemed like entries were focused around SF Bay area, but they may have expanded since then. Just browsing the map through a browser was kinda interesting - someone went in and added a bunch of McDonald's locations...LOL.

droneshare.com...looks like it may have been abandoned. No more entries since Dec 2015, and the 'about' page still says it's in beta. In fact, if you go to beta.droneshare.com, they still have the beta site running too. 

Jonathan's picture
ModeratorSeriously Addicted
Posts: 194
Joined: Jan 2 2016 - 12:08pm
For those in the UK,

For those in the UK, particularly around greater Manchester, "A website has been set up to give advice on which tourist hotspots allow drones – including some popular spots around Greater Manchester."

Check out caniflymydrone.com

http://www.uavexpertnews.com/drone-pilots-benefit-new-website-identifyin...

Vertigo's picture
ModeratorSeriously Addicted
Posts: 211
Joined: Jan 2 2016 - 1:13pm
Here's another tool that I

Here's another tool that I learned about today. It's called GlobalARC. It's for both hobby and commercial users, and is free for one user. Looks like it caters more to US users.

The platform allows you to plan and manage your flights, and watch real time video and receive data from your vehicles anywhere in the world. GlobalARC can also be used to check the airspace zoning and act accordingly or create a complex mission and upload it to any connected vehicle.

Website: https://globalarc.us/